May 21, 2018

Marijuana Politics Staff, Author at MARIJUANA POLITICS - Page 2 of 10

Oregon Leads the Way on Camping with Cannabis

camping

Oregon seems to have a knack with firsts in the evolving global marijuana market. Now, an entrepreneur in eastern Oregon appears to be leading the way on merging outdoor recreation with recreational cannabis.

Private landowner and established cannabis entrepreneur Wayne Zallen has been involved in the cannabis market in Oregon since 2014, and may now be the first in the country to open a cannabis-friendly campground for pleasure-seekers headed to the eastern part of the Beaver State. Allen recently acquired a 5-acre property, formerly known as Lake Selmac Resort, and re-dubbed the place “Smoke on the Water Lake Selmac”.

According to the USA Today affiliate, The Statesman Journal:

“(Zallen) envisions his campers lighting up in their RV or tent sites, or inside a 20-by-40-foot ‘community center’ on the property. He also plans a stage for concerts and other events, and custom tepees, massages, and yoga.”

There are still some hurdles to entry, but with private property-rights protections under current Oregon law, Zallen may be embarking on a first-of-its kind enterprise, which is quite likely to be imitated throughout the country as more lenient, adult-use cannabis laws become the norm. So far, stakeholders from the lake’s region seem willing to approach the possibility of a cannabis campground with an open mind:

“A lease of a strip of county-owned land for the docks and boathouse would need approval. The Josephine County Board of Commissioners and the Parks Department appear to be on board. Commissioners heard discussions, and approval of Zallen’s lease will be on the agenda at a public meeting soon. The lease would bring in $5,400 in six years….

“’If they manage this property they could probably do very well,’ Parks Manager Sarah Wright said. ‘I’m a little concerned about how this may affect our campgrounds, but he’s working with me.’”

One thing is for certain, the emerging cannabis industry in Oregon is brimming with ideas and great opportunities. While there will be setbacks, and hard work and perseverance will be required, the future of the marijuana industry in the Beaver State looks to be bright.

The Oregon Marijuana Business Conference (OMBC) on April 28th in Eugene presents a golden opportunity for those in the cannabis industry, and for those who are thinking of joining, to learn the latest about new rules and regulations, ask burning questions of licensed attorneys, and network with other members of the cannabis business community. Be sure to get your tickets by April 26th, and save money with Early Bird Ticket prices! Become a part of the Oregon cannabis industry which is leading the way on national politics, and be sure to see OMBC keynote speaker Henry Rollins. The OMBC is the must-attend event for the Oregon cannabis community, so get your tickets today!

Oregon Governor Kate Brown Signs Cannabis Consumer Privacy Bill

Kate Brown

Oregon Governor Kate Brown, while not perfect on marijuana policy, has been working to protect Beaver State cannabis consumers and businesses from any potential federal crackdown. Brown has joined with other governors of legalized states asking the Donald Trump Administration fulfill his campaign promise to adhere to a “states’ rights” policy, one laid out in the Obama Justice Department’s “Cole Memo.” While we are all waiting on what the Jeff Sessions-led Justice Department plans to do with regulated marijuana businesses and consumers, Gov. Brown has already signed a cannabis consumer information protection act.

From The Oregonian:

For now, the newly signed bill protects pot users by prohibiting shops from keeping or transferring customers’ personal information, including names, birth dates and addresses.

This data, typically used for marketing and customer service, is often collected from customers’ IDs, often without their knowledge. Shoppers may still sign up for emails from shops to get coupons or discounts.

Now that the law is in effect, Oregon marijuana retailers have 30 days to destroy their customers’ data from their databases. The law does not apply to medical marijuana patients.

This bill is a great step in protecting individuals that utilize Oregon cannabis retail stores, but more can be done to protect businesses and all Oregonians, not just its elected officials, need to remain vigilant against any potential federal crackdown. Oregon marijuana businesses will need to develop techniques to keep in touch with their customers as they now won’t be able to just keep all of their information, but this is a small price to pay for extra privacy protection for those using dispensaries and may actually help increase sales.

The Oregon Marijuana Business Conference (OMBC) on April 28th in Eugene, will be a great opportunity for those in the cannabis industry, or thinking of joining, to learn the latest about new rules and regulations, ask licensed attorneys burning questions, and network with others in the cannabis community. Be sure to get your tickets by April 26th, to save money. Henry Rollins will be delivering the keynote address. The OMBC is the must-attend event for the Oregon cannabis community, so get your tickets today!

 

Register Guard: Eugene, Oregon, Experiencing a Marijuana Business Boom

medical marijuana cannabis

The cannabis industry is one of the top emerging industries in Oregon, the U.S. as a whole, and even the globe. As one of the first states to legalize marijuana, after a history of progressive cannabis policies, Oregon is poised to capitalize on an exciting opportunity. The college town of Eugene, home of the University of Oregon Ducks, is a current hotbed of economic activity.

From the Register-Guard:

A map created by The Register-Guard based on data from state marijuana ­regulators shows clusters of ­marijuana shops forming in Eugene. The most popular areas for the newly ­emerging marijuana ­industry in the city are downtown, west Eugene and near the ­University of Oregon.

Available retail space and zoning rules drive the ­decision of where to open up shop, city of Eugene land use analyst Mike ­McKerrow said. “People are ­locating in places where the use is allowed,” he said. Those ­locations include commercial space in the city’s core.

Other cities around Oregon, including Portland, have a rule requiring at least 1,000 feet — about 2½ blocks — between each marijuana retailer. The Oregon Health ­Authority, which still regulates the ­handful of ­dispensaries ­selling ­marijuana only to ­medical marijuana card holders, also requires 1,000 feet between shops. Eugene doesn’t require such spacing for pot shops, and earlier this year the Eugene City ­Council decided to hold off on ­pursuing it.

Oregon’s revenue from marijuana sales far outpaced state estimates in 2016, and commerce in 2017 looks to keep pace as well. Business slowed for a bit in 2016 when the state first implemented new testing and packaging policies, but the industry has adapted. There may be a few new changes to the laws this legislative session and regulators taking input on new testing policies until April 30th, so entrepreneurs, business owners and farmers may have to adapt again. However, high quality marijuana, which Oregon certainly produces, will likely keep selling, so long as the state doesn’t overregulate the system, so the future of the Beaver State’s cannabis industry is certainly very bright.

The Oregon Marijuana Business Conference (OMBC) on April 28th in Eugene, will be a great opportunity for those in the cannabis industry, or thinking of joining, to learn the latest about new rules and regulations, ask licensed attorneys burning questions, and network with others in the cannabis community. Be sure to get your tickets by April 26th, to save money. Henry Rollins will be delivering the keynote address. The OMBC is the must-attend event for the Oregon cannabis community, so get your tickets today!

Get Your OMBC Tickets by Midnight to Save!

Henry Rollins OMBC
Buy before midnight today, April 14th  and save $100!
Now is the time to save! Ticket prices will increase $100at 11:59 pm. This event normally sells out so act now and we’ll see you in Eugene April 28!

The elections of 2016 saw an increase in the number of states legalizing marijuana but we also experienced a changing of the guard at the federal level, with indications that medical marijuana may be regaining some lost ground. Business interests in medical and adult-use recreational cannabis have never been higher, both in Oregon and abroad. The OMBC brings you the latest information and legislative updates in the wake of our new administration, and you will be able to speak directly with our panelists, many of whom are directly involved in current rules and regulations.

Of course, the OMBC also offers the finest boutique exhibitor space with today’s leading cannabis companies representing the latest technologies and products, providing the ideal networking environment!

The time is almost here for the 4th Annual Oregon Marijuana Business Conference at the Valley River Inn in Eugene, Oregon! The date is set for April 28th, but Early Bird Ticket prices end this Friday, April 14th!

Improving our lineup is our goal each year, and this year we have a stellar group of presenters from a diversity of fields who are all coming together to improve cannabis legislation in Oregon and elsewhere.

Our speakers for this year:

Henry Rollins, Keynote
Senator Floyd Prozanski
Amanda Borup from OLCC
Drake Sutton-Shearer from Prohbtd Media
Kohel Haver from law firm Swider | Haver
Kristie Cromwell
Random Vaughn
Danica Hibpshman from OLCC
Dennis Wright
Rachel Kurtz from NCIA
Eric Wendt from Green Leaf Labs
Lee Berger
Chelsea Hopkins from Greener Side
Brent Kenyon
Anthony Johnson
Justin Botillier
Alex Rogers, OMBC CEO
Anne van Leynseele

With the recent change in our federal administration, numerous questions have arisen concerning the future status of medical cannabis, and the ongoing situation with adult-use, recreational cannabis policies and the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. The Oregon Health Authority will be taking submissions for comments on testing rules until April 30th, making the OMBC a great time to learn the latest on lab regulations and a whole host of issues.

Come join us in finding out the most up-to-date information on all things cannabis in Oregon! This year’s event is selling quickly but Early Bird Tickets are still available through April 14, offering a savings of up to $100 off ticket prices! See you soon!

Are You Ready for the Biggest Oregon Marijuana Business Conference Ever?

Henry Rollins OMBC

The time is almost here for the 4th Annual Oregon Marijuana Business Conference at the Valley River Inn in Eugene, Oregon! The date is set for April 28th, but Early Bird Ticket prices end this Friday, April 14th!

Improving our lineup is our goal each year, and this year we have a stellar group of presenters from a diversity of fields who are all coming together to improve cannabis legislation in Oregon and elsewhere.

Our speakers for this year:

Henry Rollins, Keynote
Senator Floyd Prozanski
Amanda Borup from OLCC
Drake Sutton-Shearer from Prohbtd Media
Kohel Haver from law firm Swider | Haver
Kristie Cromwell
Random Vaughn
Danica Hibpshman from OLCC
Dennis Wright
Rachel Kurtz from NCIA
Eric Wendt from Green Leaf Labs
Lee Berger
Chelsea Hopkins from Greener Side
Brent Kenyon
Anthony Johnson
Justin Botillier
Alex Rogers, OMBC CEO
Anne van Leynseele

With the recent change in our federal administration, numerous questions have arisen concerning the future status of medical cannabis, and the ongoing situation with adult-use, recreational cannabis policies and the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. The Oregon Health Authority will be taking submissions for comments on testing rules until April 30th, making the OMBC a great time to learn the latest on lab regulations and a whole host of issues.

Come join us in finding out the most up-to-date information on all things cannabis in Oregon! This year’s event is selling quickly but Early Bird Tickets are still available through April 14, offering a savings of up to $100 off ticket prices! See you in Eugene!

Understanding the Legal Limits for Marijuana in Washington

Legal Limits for Marijuana in Washington

The people of Washington have spoken, and it is yet another example of “going green!” While this proves to be a victory for the will of the People, the potential challenges to states’ rights versus federalism will have to be tabled for a different discussion. Understanding the legal limits for Marijuana in Washington State is easy to follow.

Washington’s Initiative 502 placed Washington at the forefront of the legalization of recreational marijuana use. However, just because marijuana is now legal in Washington does not mean there are not limitations on where it can be used, how much you can possess, and of course, potential punishments for driving under the influence (DUI). Thus, especially with DUI implications and open-container laws, it helps to think of marijuana like alcohol. For example, it is a traffic infraction to operate a motor vehicle on a highway with an open alcohol container2.   Similarly, it is also a traffic infraction to operate a motor vehicle on a highway with an open container of marijuana.3

Just as with mixing alcohol and/or prescription medication and driving, you can be cited for a DUI after consuming marijuana. Most people are familiar with .08 legal limit for alcohol consumption and driving, however, the legal limit for marijuana consumption and driving is a little more vague. The legal limit for marijuana is 5.0 nanograms of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol or THC.4  There is an important distinction between THC, which is active and causes impairment, versus carboxy-TCH which is stored in a person’s body and does not contain active TCH.5  If you drive with 5.0 nanograms or more of THC in your system, you place yourself at risk of being charged with a DUI.

Marijuana is legal, but there are restrictions regarding age, how much you can possess, where you can purchase it, and where you can consume it. No one under the age of twenty-one (21) may use or possess marijuana. You can purchase and possess up to one (1) once (or 28 grams) of “useable” marijuana – the green stuff you smoke – up to sixteen (16) ounces of marijuana-infused edibles in solid form, seventy-two (72) ounces in liquid form, and seven (7) grams of marijuana concentrates. Marijuana, in all forms, can only be sold and purchased at state-licensed retail stores. Use of marijuana is restricted to private property; it is illegal to consume marijuana in public.6

Marijuana is legal in Washington, but know the laws and use common sense and moderation so as to not run afoul of these laws. In sum, you must be 21 to have it, do not use it in public, you cannot have more than an ounce of it, and you should not drive on it. Understanding the legal limits for Marijuana in Washington State is of utmost importance for Washington State residents.


[1] See http://lcb.wa.gov/mj2015/faqs_i-502 for a brief discussion of federal law concerning marijuana.

[1] See RCW 46.61.519, http://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=46.61.519.

[1] See RCW 46.61.745, http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=46.61.745. Per the statute, unless the marijuana in your car is in the trunk or inaccessible, the marijuana must be in a sealed, unopened package or container.

[1] See RCW 46.61.502, http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=46.61.502.

[1] See RCW 46.04.586, http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=46.04.586.

[1] See http://lcb.wa.gov/mj-education/know-the-law.

Donald Trump and Marijuana Politics

donald-trump-and-marijuana-politics

By Roger Stone

President Donald Trump and Marijuana Politics is one of the most controversial decisions he will have to make . The question is whether to continue the federal stand-down by the us Justice department in which DOJ does not enforce federal marijuana laws where they contradict state laws legalizing the legal use and sale of marijuana in the 37 states where it is currently legal in some form. Although he has a long standing personal opposition to drug use Trump has also expressed support for the medicinal use of marijuana in the states where it is legal.

Canceling the order by Obama attorney general Eric Holder to stand down on Marijuana would cause a major dislocation in multiple states that are currently budgeting millions in state revenue from the taxation of marijuana and un-employing hundreds of thousands of people currently working in an industry legalized by the states. I would urge President-Elect Trump to view this as a business man; U.S. government cannot turn back the clock on federal marijuana law enforcement.

Just over one year ago, on November 23, 2016, GQ Magazine published a video interview of Donald J. Trump while he was campaigning for POTUS.  In this interview, he was asked his opinion about legalized marijuana, to which he answered “Legalized marijuana is always a difficult question . . . for medicinal purposes, for medical purposes, absolutely, it’s fine.”

trump cannabis Donald TRrump and Marijuana Politics A month before, on October 29, 2015, then Candidate Trump told the Washington Post: “In terms of marijuana and legalization, I think that should be a state issue, state-by-state. Marijuana is such a big thing. I think medical should. And then I really believe we should leave it up to the states. And of course, you have Colorado. There’s a question as to how it’s all working out there, you know? That’s not going exactly trouble-free.”

While many Internet sources say that sometime in 1990, the Sarasota Herald Tribune published an article that Donald J. Trump said the War on Drugs was a joke, this researcher has found that what actually occurred was on April 14, 1990, at a Company of the Year Award luncheon, sponsored by the Sarasota Herald Tribune for their annual prize announcement, Donald J. Trump was invited to speak.  Trump said he thought the Drug Enforcement Agency efficacy was a joke, and that “we’re losing badly in the war on drugs … you have to take the profit away from these drug czars … tax revenues from a legalized drug trade could be spent to educate the public on the dangers of drugs.”  Portugal tried this model in 2001, and it is considered a great success by the Portuguese more than fifteen years later.

While Donald Trump is on record at the 2015 CPAC making a statement about recreational marijuana, “I say it’s bad.  Medical marijuana is another thing, but I think it’s bad, and I feel strongly about it.”  Donald was speaking to Conservatives, and while that might have been the reasoning behind making such a marked change of direction from his position in the 1990’s, his position on Medical Marijuana, even in the face of these same Conservatives, remains unchanged.

During the same election that won Trump the Presidency, there was another vote on the Florida ballot.  Amendment 2 passed with an overwhelming majority, with more than 71% of the States votes, on the Left and the Right, approving of Medical Marijuana.  This is a far higher percentage of the population than voted for Donald Trump, which reported by the State of Florida, stands at just over 49%.

Florida was not alone, as California, Nevada, and Massachusetts approved of recreational marijuana, and North Dakota and Arkansas passing their own Medical Marijuana provisions.

All told, twenty-eight States and Washington D.C. now have legalized Medical Marijuana.  A clear majority of States and population are for it, nationwide.

A great many pro-marijuana organizations, publications, and Internet outlets put their support behind Donald Trump based on his positive statements about Medical Marijuana.  People who have marijuana rights as their primary political issue turned to Trump, many against long time party affiliation, in hopes of greater freedom and less abuse at the hands of Federal Agencies.

If, after winning the election, Donald Trump listens to the likes of Chris Christie and Jeff Sessions he risks alienating his base and his newly won supporters in a very tangible way. Both Sessions and Christie come from ‘Old World’ War on Drugs thinking.

Donald Trump Peace SignCriminalized Marijuana has directly lead to the persecution of countless individuals, the vast majority of whom are poor and minorities.  That this was the desired result of the designers of the system of criminalization cannot be reasonable doubted.

“Laws to suppress tend to strengthen what they would prohibit.  This is the fine point on which all legal professions throughout history have based their jobs security.” – Frank Herbert

We cannot leave it to ‘Law Enforcement’ types to decide what is to be allowed and what is to be prohibited.  The People must decide for themselves, and they have decided.  Overwhelmingly so. They have decided they want legalized marijuana.

“If the people let government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny.”  – Thomas Jefferson

Drain the Swamp.  Limit Federal Power.  Reel-in out-of-control Alphabet Soup agencies.  Return respect for law.  These are all things Donald Trump made as major issues for his campaign platform.

“The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced.” – Albert Einstein

A precipitous move by the Trump administration to change the equation on legal marijuana in the states could in fact bring action by congress where a coalition of liberal Democrats and libertarian republicans are moving towards legislation to legalize the plant.

http://stonecoldtruth.com/roger-stone-donald-trump-and-the-politics-of-marijuana/

Roger Stone is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Man Who Killed Kennedy. He is a legendary American political consultant and strategist who played a key role in the election of Republican presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush. He was also instrumental in the 2000 Florida recount responsible for the election of George W. Bush and the 2016 election of Donald Trump. Read his new book – The Making of the President 2016: How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution.

ICBC Berlin Tickets Go Up Tonight at Midnight!

ICBC Tommy Chong

Tickets go up $150 tonight at Midnight PST!

Last Chance! Berlin ICBC Kicks Off Next Week!

Europe’s first B2B Cannabis Business Conference will be held in Germany next week! Join us for this historic event!

So what are you waiting for? The International Cannabis Business Conference is set to commence in mere days, and tickets are moving quickly! Get your ICBC tickets by Friday, April 7th, to save, before prices go up.

Starting on Monday evening, April 10th, VIP members will participate in a little conference pregame action with a not-to-be-missed networking event with international cannabis law reform heavyweights such as US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, the iconic Tommy Chong, and many other VIPs on the speakers and attendees list.

This first-of-a-kind event in Europe will exhibit a perspective of how the marijuana industry is working in various countries’ legal systems, with a particular focus on current medical research and application. Tuesday kicks off with keynote speaker Dr. Eva Milz, MD, highly recognized neurologist and psychiatrist who has emerged as a foremost expert on cannabinoids in the brain and body. Other recognized professionals from the medical discipline include Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, MD, Dr. Pierre Debs, PhD, Dr. Ingo Michels, MD, Dr. Reggie Gaudino, PhD, Dr. Jokūbas Žiburkus, PhD, Dr. Pavel Jeřábek, Dr. Pavel Kubů, MD, and many, many more.

Of course, many other qualified speakers will be on hand to discuss industry-specific topics including Testing and Standardization, Extractions Technology, International Medical Cannabis Policies, Lobbying for Cannabis, Cannabis and Media, Consumer Tech and Branding, The Future of Cannabis Genetics in a Global Commercial Marketplace, Imports and Exports, and Cannabis Cultivation and New Technologies.

Visit here for a full list of speakers and their bios and here for the complete schedule of topics.

Secure your spot now for this monumental moment in marijuana history! Get your tickets now for Europe’s first International Cannabis Business Conference in Berlin, Germany, April 10-12! We’ll see you there!

Berlin ICBC Tickets Go Up Tomorrow!

TommyChongSteveBloom
Last Chance! Berlin ICBC Kicks Off Next Week!
Tickets go up $150 tomorrowat Midnight PST!
Europe’s first B2B Cannabis Business Conference will be held in Germany next week! Join us for this historic event!

So what are you waiting for? The International Cannabis Business Conference is set to commence in mere days, and tickets are moving quickly! Get your ICBC tickets by Friday, April 7th, to save, before prices go up.

Starting on Monday evening, April 10th, VIP members will participate in a little conference pregame action with a not-to-be-missed networking event with international cannabis law reform heavyweights such as US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, the iconic Tommy Chong, and many other VIPs on the speakers and attendees list.

This first-of-a-kind event in Europe will exhibit a perspective of how the marijuana industry is working in various countries’ legal systems, with a particular focus on current medical research and application. Tuesday kicks off with keynote speaker Dr. Eva Milz, MD, highly recognized neurologist and psychiatrist who has emerged as a foremost expert on cannabinoids in the brain and body. Other recognized professionals from the medical discipline include Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, MD, Dr. Pierre Debs, PhD, Dr. Ingo Michels, MD, Dr. Reggie Gaudino, PhD, Dr. Jokūbas Žiburkus, PhD, Dr. Pavel Jeřábek, Dr. Pavel Kubů, MD, and many, many more.

Of course, many other qualified speakers will be on hand to discuss industry-specific topics including Testing and Standardization, Extractions Technology, International Medical Cannabis Policies, Lobbying for Cannabis, Cannabis and Media, Consumer Tech and Branding, The Future of Cannabis Genetics in a Global Commercial Marketplace, Imports and Exports, and Cannabis Cultivation and New Technologies.

Visit here for a full list of speakers and their bios and here for the complete schedule of topics.

Secure your spot now for this monumental moment in marijuana history! Get your tickets now for Europe’s first International Cannabis Business Conference in Berlin, Germany, April 10-12! We’ll see you there!

Get Your ICBC Tickets By Friday, April 7th!

ICBC Tommy Chong

Time is running out to attend Europe’s first cannabis B2B conference!

So what are you waiting for? The International Cannabis Business Conference is set to commence in mere days, and tickets are moving quickly! Get your ICBC tickets by Friday, April 7th, to save, before prices go up.

Starting on Monday evening, April 10th, VIP members will participate in a little conference pregame action with a not-to-be-missed networking event with international cannabis law reform heavyweights such as US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, the iconic Tommy Chong, and many other VIPs on the speakers and attendees list.

This first-of-a-kind event in Europe will exhibit a perspective of how the marijuana industry is working in various countries’ legal systems, with a particular focus on current medical research and application. Tuesday kicks off with keynote speaker Dr. Eva Milz, MD, highly recognized neurologist and psychiatrist who has emerged as a foremost expert on cannabinoids in the brain and body. Other recognized professionals from the medical discipline include Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, MD, Dr. Pierre Debs, PhD, Dr. Ingo Michels, MD, Dr. Reggie Gaudino, PhD, Dr. Jokūbas Žiburkus, PhD, Dr. Pavel Jeřábek, Dr. Pavel Kubů, MD, and many, many more.

Of course, many other qualified speakers will be on hand to discuss industry-specific topics including Testing and Standardization, Extractions Technology, International Medical Cannabis Policies, Lobbying for Cannabis, Cannabis and Media, Consumer Tech and Branding, The Future of Cannabis Genetics in a Global Commercial Marketplace, Imports and Exports, and Cannabis Cultivation and New Technologies.

Visit here for a full list of speakers and their bios and here for the complete schedule of topics.

Secure your spot now for this monumental moment in marijuana history! Get your tickets now for Europe’s first International Cannabis Business Conference in Berlin, Germany, April 10-12! We’ll see you there!

The Difficulties of Cannabis Branding

As anyone in the field knows, cannabis is an industry completely unlike any other. The history of prohibition, and the conflict between state and federal laws creates a much greater degree of uncertainty than is found in other vying markets. Maintaining compliance with constantly changing (and often over-reaching) health and safety regulations, ensuring quality and competitive products for consumers, dealing in a cash economy with constantly opening and closing bank accounts, and treading the delicate line of appropriate tax behavior, all serve to completely occupy the time and mental power of the budding cannabis entrepreneur.

Yet all that work is for naught and your business will fail if no one recognizes your product or name.

Finding the right name, creating memorable imagery, ensuring quality and consistent products, and marketing in a meaningful way are all necessary for the equation of good branding. But in the cannabis industry, the usual rules do not apply.

To begin with, patenting is a huge obstacle. Because the federal government classifies cannabis as a completely illegal substance, one cannot simply register a brand name as a trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Quite simply, there is no assured federal legal protection for anyone in the cannabis trade.

However, Oliver Herzfeld at Forbes has a few pieces of advice for business start-ups which are looking to create a brand for long-term success in the trade: avoid infringement of other brand names; use your brand in a legal commercial enterprise in the meantime; register with your brand at the state level; create ancillary cannabis products which complement your product and use your brand name (such as vaporizers or rolling papers); and consider trademark licensing to third party cannabis companies who can secure longer-term branding abilities in states with legal markets.

While there are no guarantees in such a new and unusual market, experts agree that good branding is paramount to prosperity in the cannabis industry. As usual with anything marijuana business related, there are extra obstacles placed in front of entrepreneurs, but many great opportunities as well.

If you are one of those looking for prosperity in the Oregon cannabis industry, you certainly won’t want to miss the Tech and Branding panel at the Oregon Marijuana Business Conference, this April 28th in Eugene. Get your tickets before prices increase!

Can Oregon Become the Top Rated Medical Cannabis Program?

medical marijuana cannabis

For someone new entering into the cannabis world, a person doesn’t go too long before they will hear the phrase, “standing on the backs of patients”. That’s because we as a country are at a critical moment in time in which we must negotiate the space between a community of people who need cannabis as a medicine, viewing it from a health-based lens, and those who would risk their personal freedoms and assets in the unusually risky entrepreneurial gamble of the cannabis industry.

As is clear to anyone paying attention in US politics in the last 7 years, finding a political balance between public health needs and the financial interests of the private sector is tricky business. But this is the exact moment in time in which all stakeholders should be coming to the table to find effective and meaningful solutions.

Unfortunately, in many ways, the old system for medical cannabis in Oregon has been revamped, and what will happen next remains to be seen. Overall plant numbers per Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) grow sites have been restricted, but patients can still cultivate for themselves if they are able (with an unlimited number of seedlings now) and purchase products tax-free at dispensaries. But the poorest patients unable to cultivate cannabis, or find someone to cultivate for them, are being deprived safe access. Oregon has a golden opportunity to become a national political model that supports both patients and a strong industry. Establishing a low-income patient program, until healthcare providers and insurance companies fully integrate medical cannabis (like Germany is implementing) is definitely needed in Oregon (as well as every medical cannabis state).

Americans for Safe Access, an international organization focused solely on medical cannabis advocacy, recently created a report card of state medical cannabis laws and the degree to which policy meets the needs of patients. Executive Director Steph Sherer points out the laws fail to adequately support patient needs pretty much everywhere, but the coalition of change agents is growing:

“‘Medical cannabis laws are moving in a positive direction, but only a handful of the forty-four medical cannabis states are truly meeting the needs of patients, and there are still six states where cannabis remains completely illegal for patients. In short, we’re seeing a lot of progress, but the fight is far from over. As of 2017, no state cannabis laws are within the ‘A’ range. Only a small minority of states currently include ASA’s criteria of protections and rights that we believe all patients should be afforded under the law.

“‘What we’re experiencing is the byproduct of a movement of doctors, scientists, patients, their families, and policymakers advocating for a patients’ safe access to medical cannabis. Every positive change in a law or regulation is the result of thousands of hours of  work by these stakeholders. With 16 states improving their laws and dozens more making improvements through regulations, we are proud to report an overall positive trend for medical cannabis patients across the country.’

“‘States such as Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming are among the lowest ranking, while Arkansas, Florida, Michigan, Montana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania have shown the greatest improvement over 2015 laws. Despite the positive trend, no state falls within the “A” range.”

Oregon was one of 11 states to receive a “B” rating or above. But how can Oregon move forward in a reasonable way to support a new market economy while not standing on the backs of patients?

The question before us must be answered, and it’s certain to be a topic of hot conversation at the Oregon Marijuana Business Conference, which always keeps patients at the forefront, on April 28th in Eugene. Get your tickets today!

Oregon Marijuana Business Conference to Cover Testing Controversy

Lab test

Testing. One, two, three.

Changes are coming to Oregon’s laws governing pesticide testing for adult-use cannabis. But what those laws will look like remain somewhat unknown. Recently, the Oregon Health Authority’s rules advisory committee – which oversees pesticide regulation for both medical and adult-use – suggested an adjustment to the current amount of product required to undergo lab evaluation.

According to The Oregonian:

“Among the proposals: Instead of requiring that every batch of marijuana extract and concentrate be screened for pesticide contamination, the products would be randomly tested annually. But all of the marijuana used to make those products would first be screened for pesticides.

“The state also has proposed new rules for marijuana flower headed to the market.

“Current rules require about 33 percent of all batches of marijuana flower for the recreational system be tested for pesticides. The change would give authority to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to require less testing. Under the proposal, at least 20 percent of marijuana flower would undergo pesticide testing. (In the medical marijuana system, 100 percent of medical flower batches still would undergo pesticide testing.)”

The new rules are exceedingly controversial. The ugly negotiations of creating policy have been likened to making sausage for a good reason. Many factors are necessary to consider when including all stakeholders. Growers, concentrate processors, distributors, consumers and lab-testing facilities all play different roles whose needs must be considered. Ultimately, consumers and “the people” should win out in a democracy – as long as they come to the table. Consumers must have their safety ensured, but also will dislike paying even greater costs for an already heavily-taxed item. A draft of the proposed rules for public comment is expected soon, as early as today, March 15th, and comments will be accepted through April 30th.

New rules for pesticide-testing in Oregon are certain to be a hot topic of conversation in Eugene on April 28th at the Oregon Marijuana Business Conference, and will be specifically included on the agenda. Come to the table and be part of Oregon’s dialogue. Get your tickets today!

Oregon Marijuana Business Conference Schedule Announced

OMBC 2017

The Oregon Marijuana Business Conference is coming – and it is right around the corner!

Join the host of cannabis experts and meet the ganjapreneurs making cannabis business a profitable reality on April 28th in Eugene. The program has been announced, and the following topics will be covered:

OLCC Regulations
Oregon has seen a tidal wave of policy change related to commercial cannabis activity. This panel will feature several speakers from the state regulatory agencies tasked with regulating and licensing cannabis businesses in Oregon. This panel will deliver up-to-date and accurate information regarding the status of forthcoming state regulations and licenses across all facets of the industry.

Staying Medical
There are some small mom and pops that are finding ways to survive and even thrive. Whether it is staying medical, securing a micro canopy license and utilizing the upcoming increase in canopy size allowed for OLCC growers that keep growing for patients, we’ll have some small farmers on hand to talk about the challenges and opportunities for small businesses and farmers.

Distribution
A hot topic among all consumer brands and manufactures, our panelists include a diversity of distribution models including agricultural cooperatives, independent distributors, online wholesale marketplace platforms, aggregation and processing centers, transportation and security providers. The panel will provide a comprehensive analysis of license types and distribution models conducive to all types and sizes of operators and their needs.

Tech and Branding
Cannabis has gone mainstream, which means ratcheting up innovation and focusing on brand are crucial factors for success. Our panel features cannabis industry disruptors along with media professionals from fortune 500 companies, discussing the new competitive paradigm, including a focus on recreational consumers.

Taxes and Cannabis
Navigating the IRS 280E limitations can be a daunting task; if not properly understood the risk of paying too much tax, or being audited, is high. Operating a parallel business to reclaim otherwise disallowed deductions is a tried and true way to handle the 280E limitations. Selecting the right Business Entity for your business is essential and by far the most effective way to mitigate your tax liability as well as keep your audit profile low.

Oregon Testing Regulations
Oregon’s testing standards went through a dramatic overhaul last October with new rules and regulations creating a bottleneck at licensed labs, hindering the cannabis industry. With more state-regulated labs now online, the congestion in the supply chain seems to have subsided as it’s being reported that marijuana products are getting about a one-week turnaround at most testing facilities. However, problems, and controversies, still remain.

The state has adopted temporary rules that have loosened up the testing standards and protocols, a move that has divided many in the cannabis community as we work towards a policy that sufficiently protects consumers, especially patients, while not unnecessarily over regulating the industry.. The state is taking comment on the issue until April 30th, making this panel’s topic an extremely relevant conversation for the cannabis community.

Celebrity Interview with John Salley
Freedom Leaf editor Steve Bloom interviews former NBA star and medical marijuana advocate John Salley, who won four championships with the Pistons, Bulls and Lakers during his 14-year professional career.

It’s an event you won’t want to miss, so mark you calendars and buy your tickets now for the 2017 OMBC in Eugene!

Get Your ICBC Tickets By Midnight This Wednesday!

ICBCSF

You have been waiting your whole life to attend the International Cannabis Business Conference (ICBC) in San Francisco in the wake of adult cannabis legalization – so why are you still waiting to buy tickets to attend? The conference is this Thursday, February 17th! That means prices will increase on Wednesday at midnight – so don’t delay any longer! Get your tickets now!

The ICBC is the premier cannabis conference and expo, and this year’s line-up includes some of the best minds in the industry. This Thursday is your chance to hear from Chief of the Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation of California, Lori Ajax, whose unofficial title is “California Marijuana Czar” and who will be one of the most influential agents in the roll-out of cannabis regulations in Sacramento over the next year. If you are interested in federal level policy, you won’t be disappointed to hear from a series of qualified speakers who will address the topic, “Speaking Republican: How to Survive and Thrive During the Trump Administration” including political and cannabis veterans Steve Grand, Joe Hunter, Nathan Daschle, and Mary Patton.

The stage will also be graced with more mainstream celebrities, including actor, entertainer and cultural icon Henry Rollins, who will speak to the larger social and political ramifications of the global shift toward legalized adult cannabis use. Four-time NBA basketball champion John Salley  will also be in attendance and interviewed live onstage by Steve Bloom, Editor-in-Chief of Freedom Leaf and former editor of High Times.

Of course, attending the ICBC on Thursday is the most important part of the week, but if you are able to join Wednesday evening there will be a special VIP meet-and-greet with conference speakers, including keynote speaker Henry Rollins along with special guest California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, the current frontrunner for California’s next gubernatorial election in 2018, and fierce national leader of cannabis law reform.

Tickets to the ICBC go up on Wednesday at midnight, so buy yours now!

This blog was origninally published at www.internationalcbc.com and has bee reposted here with special permission.