Some Things to Know About Germany and Marijuana

   

With the International Cannabis Business Conference (ICBC) making its first appearance in Berlin in April, it is good for attendees to get up-to-date on the latest cannabis developments in Germany. Like many places across the world, marijuana is moving more and more mainstream in Germany with some major political advancements. Also, like many places around the globe, positive change can come much slower than it should.

Thelocal.de delivers German news in English and ran the piece “Five things to know about weed in Germany” covering: who can smoke; when will it be legalized; how much can you possess; how widespread is marijuana use; and what about stoner culture. From www.thelocal.de:

Who can smoke?

In the country of 81 million people, about 650 patients had been legally granted permission to use medicinal cannabis products from pharmacies as of spring of 2016.

How much can you possess?

The amount that an individual can possess without being prosecuted varies across the 16 states. In capital city Berlin, the rules are much more liberal, with the possession limit being 15 grams in most cases. In many other states, the limit is six grams.

How widespread is marijuana use?

A Eurostat study for 2015 showed that more German young men smoke weed than young women with roughly 18 percent of men aged between 15 and 24 reporting using cannabis in 2012, compared to a little more than 10 percent of women in that age group.

Head on over to www.thelocal.de to read the entire post. 

As cannabis law reformers know, it is often two steps forward and one step back, but the most important thing is to keep making progress. With recent political progress in Berlin and Düsseldorf, Germany is poised to legalize cannabis in the near future, but it will take a lot of work on several fronts. We hope that the ICBC will help add to the momentum in Germany and the country will see an increase in the number of patients, the mainstreaming of cannabis use overall and soon, legal cannabis commerce among adults. The future of the German cannabis industry is very bright and advancements in the European Union powerhouse will only help our international fight to end cannabis prohibition.

This blog was originally published at www.internationalcbc.com and has been reposted here with special permission. 

Anthony Johnson

Anthony, a longtime cannabis law reform advocate, was Chief Petitioner and co-author of Measure 91, Oregon's cannabis legalization effort. He served as director of both the New Approach Oregon and Vote Yes on 91 PACs, the political action committees responsible for the state's legalization campaign. As director of New Approach Oregon, Anthony continues to work towards effectively implementing the cannabis legalization system while protecting small business owners and the rights of patients. He sits on the Oregon Marijuana Rules Advisory Committee and fights for sensible rules at the legislature as well as city councils and county commissions across the state. Anthony helps cannabis business comply with Oregon's laws and advises advocates across the country. He also serves as content director of both the International Cannabis Business Conference and the Oregon Marijuana Business Conference, helping share the vision of moving the cannabis industry forward in a way that maintains the focus on keeping people out of prison and protecting patients. He was a member of the Oregon Health Authority Rules Advisory Committee, assisting the drafting of the administrative rules governing Oregon’s state-licensed medical marijuana facilities. He first co-authored and helped pass successful marijuana law reform measures while a law student at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law. He passed the Oregon Bar in 2005 and practiced criminal defense for two years before transitioning to working full-time in the political advocacy realm. His blogs on Marijuana Politics are personal in nature and don't speak for or reflect the opinions of any group or organization.